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Thought we could have a little discussion about the things you absolutely must have when hitting the trails, and no whiskey is not a must have :cool:



Dual End Wrenches

Always good to keep a couple multi-sized wrenches on board in case you're forced to make repairs out on the trails. No one plans to brake down, no matter how well you take care of your machine no tools= not fixing it. Probably pretty safe with carrying at least 10/12 mils and 14/17 mils.

Matches

Again no one plans to break down or get lost, BUT if the worst goes down do you really want to spend all night in the dark and damp cold? Simple precautionary measure can provide comfort when you need it most.

Cell Phone

As long as you have service it will be almost impossible to get yourself lost.

TP

We're not bears and no body ever looks forward to picking up a pinecone for purpose use. Chuck it in a ziploc, one day you will be thankful ;)

Zip Ties

The side by siders duct tape. Stash a bunch in multiple sizes, considering their uses are almost without limit there is no excuse not to have a bunch just in case.

Tire Kit

Including the patch kit and a Co2 inflator. Its all well and good if you patch the flat but riding on a uninflated tire is going to chew up the tire 9 out of 10 times, not to mention hamper your performance. Nobody likes limping home.

Multi Tool

Doesn't really need explanation, carry a bunch in one. What would you rather a tool chest, or worse none?

Rope

How useful is 15 or 20 feet of rope? So useful that you won't know how badly you need it until you don't have it.



These are just some basics, feel free to chip in some of your other must haves.
 

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Spare belt
Yamaha has some mighty fine belts, but a spare belt is always a must have. Learn how to change it at home, so if it ever comes down to it, one will be familiar and comfortable doing the swap out on the trail.
 

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Living in the Yukon means that we can easily be 100's of miles away from anything so you have to do a balancing act between bringing enough and bringing too much. Fortunately fly in hunting trips, and my dad, have taught me to plan and try and bring things that can be used for multiple purposes and that don't take much space.

Tarp
- Folds flat and takes almost no space. Can be laid out on ground if you have to do some work to keep relatively clean, can be used as a shelter or bed over night if you break down.

Hatchet - Can be used for firewood, cutting a piece of wood to fill a rut to get unstuck, or to whittle a plug to put into a gas tank (actually seen this done). I even saw someone whittle a flipper for the frying pan once with a hatchet because we forgot it at home.

Trail map - Believe it or not GPS's and cell phones fail. Sometimes you need to go old school and read a map. And up here in the north while a GPS tells you where you are that doesn't exactly help you if you don't know where you are going.

Pen and Paper - You would be amazed how often you forget trail markers, landmarks, or even things that you need to do to your rig when you get home. Plus I like to record when I fuel up and how far we go.

Gas - We always carry a couple liters (quarts to my American friends) in old clean oil bottles. They fit around other gear, and if I can get an extra 10 miles closer to home it could be the difference between spending a night on the trail or a night in my own bed and in a pinch the gas can be used to start fires with wet wood. While you are at it some oil wouldn't hurt either, just don't mix them up with the gas "jugs", mark them appropriately.

Chocolate Bars - Just remember that these are for emergencies, but if you are going to be forced to overnight somewhere it is always good to have some quick energy. They fit in the glove box, just remember to check and replace regularly. Also put in a zip lock bag, nothing worse then opening the glove box and having a mess of chocolate everywhere.

Of course there is other stuff that I leave in my camper that I have forgotten to mention because I NEVER take it out because it is safety gear. Ropes, tarps, electrical tape stay in the vehicle, it all is cheap insurance and why get out in the woods without something because you grabbed a $9 tarp out of the truck to do something.

Paul
 

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food, first aid, tools + weapon, gas, map

tools being a general term

but lots of tools are needed including say hatchet or knives or tools to fix the Viking.
 

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Winch
Tow strap
Tree savers
Gloves
D-shackles
Snatch block
Small mechanics tool set
12v inflator
Tire patch/plug kit
First aid kit

Also a few of the items already mentioned in this thread.

Never trail ride without them. These items will get you out of 99% of the tough situations you can get yourself in.
 

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I run tracks, a high lift jack is onboard at all times. I put it in spots it shouldn't be at times :)

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk
 

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Doors

Hey everyone im from the hills of west virgina an i have had a viking since augest of last year and im just now getting into fixing my viking up and i have been looking for a set of doors full or half it really doesnt matter anyone know where to buy them yet?
 

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Throw in a couple of the headlamps you wear on your head along with the flashlights. Mighty handy and keeps your hands free. ($10 for two at Costco)
 

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I usually have a head lamp, a lighter, tp, a tow strap, snacks and a 50qt ice chest full of adult beverages on rides. Sometimes my wife has to drive back.
 
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For us guys out west, who may get WAY OUT there
Volt meter, and copy of electronic schematics
Extra fuses/ electric wire of different gages
VHF/GMRS or CB radios (esp. out west, many places without cell phone reception)
Drinking water
Signal mirror, smoke and signal flair (maybe a bit excessive)
Back up motorcycle Lithium battery (for when a battery goes flat, it will allow you to at least start your vehicle)
Jumper cables
Camping cable saw
Spot transmitter/ emergency locator beacons
 

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Power Pack

61VM0+LGHvL._SL1500_.jpg Just picked up one of these for our Viking Survival Pack on those 70 mile back country trips. Very impressive. Will start most any vehicle except a diesel numerous time on one charge. and charges all of our gizmo's as well. Gives great peace of mind when way back in the sticks for $150!
 
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