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I tore a CV boot while away riding last weekend so took the opportunity to write up the replacement procedures. Once you have a torn boot it is important not to get any dirt in the boot, if you do you may end up needing to replace the whole CV joint. To avoid ingress of any dirt either park the bike and fix, or if you have to keep riding wrap the torn boot in tape, then a rag and more tape. Or a plastic bag and tape. Remember though even if you stop dirt from getting in you will be losing grease, so extended rides like this may ruin the CV joint anyway. If you are a long way from home and have grease, you could pump the torn boot full, tape it up, wrap it in a bag, and you should be able to ride a long way like this. I'm going to carry spare boots from now on.

1) Jack your Viking up. You will lose diff oil when you remove your axle so by jacking the broken side up high you may prevent this. You won't lose enough for this to be a problem, there will still be plenty of oil to get you home etc.

Remove the wheel and brake caliper. The caliper has a bolt top and bottom, once it's removed either rest it on the lower A arm or hang it from underneath the bed by wire. Get a punch or screwdriver and bend out the part of the axle nut that is peened over into the axle groove. If you can't get it all out don't worry, a rattle gun will get the nut off anyway. It's best to use a rattle gun as the axle nut is very hard to get off otherwise.
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2) Once the nut is off, slide the hub and brake disc off the axle. Then undo the upper and lower A arm pivot bolts remove the bolts and put the bearing hub aside.

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3) Now it's time to remove the axle from the final drive. The axle is held into the diff by a small wire circlip that sits on the axle inside the diff. You have to provide enough pull on the axle to get the circlip to slide through the spline and out. The inner CV joint has enough play in it for you to use it as a hammer. Hold the axle, push it in towards the bike then quickly pull it out towards you. Keep doing this and the axle will eventually start to slide out of the diff. Once out, place the axle in a vice, clean the dirt off and cut the torn boot and oldclamps off.

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4) Now you need to remove the wheel end CV joint from the axle. It too is held on by a steel circlip on the axle, so lay the axle flat in a vice, and holding the hub spline end of the CV joint up with one hand tap the CV away from the axle with a hammer while pulling on the spline, it will start to slide off the axle. Now wash all of the old grease (and any potential dirt) out of the CV joint itself with petrol and/or carby cleaner.

Note the circlip on the axle in the photo below, that is what holds the CV joint on. Note also that the circlip in the photo is bent, the CV will NOT go back on with the circlip like this. Ideally you will have a new circlip to use when you do this repair, however the $26 aftermarket boot kit that I bought didn't come with one, and Yamaha had them on back order for over a month, so I had to re-use the old one. I've ordered a couple from Yamaha to keep as spares for next time. If you need to re-use the old clip, remove it from the axle and carefully squash it back into shape with a pair of large pliers etc. It's not hardened steel like a normal circlip so it breaks fairly easily so be careful, if you break it your Viking will be unusable until you can get a new one!

Slide the new boot onto the axle, and pack the inside of the CV joint with the grease that came with the boot kit. Make sure that you get the grease all down around the ball bearings and when full, carefully tap the CV back onto the shaft until fully seated.

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5) Now empty the rest of the grease into the joint, make sure that you use it all, it is the right amount of grease to suit the joint.

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6) Wipe any grease away from where the boot sits on the shaft and slide the boot into place. Put the clamps in place making sure that the tails face away from the direction that the axle turns.

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7) Using a CV Boot Clamp tool tighten one clamp, and using a hammer tap down hard the tail of the clamp where it folds back over itself, then tap the two lugs down on the tail then snip off the excess. Do not over tighten the clamp, it just needs to be firm. If you don't have a CV boot clamp tool use a pair of pliers, you should be able to get it tight enough. Then slide a screwdriver between the rubber of the boot and the axle to "burp" the boot. Once done tighten the other clamp.

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A close up of the finished clamp

2020-10-11 10.09.37.jpg
 

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I took the opportunity to grease the A arm pivots on the bearing hub. Take the caps off, slide the spacer out, give the zerk one pump to make sure it isn't clogged then re-assemble and pump full of grease.

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Check the wheel bearing whilst you have the hub off by putting two or three fingers inside the bearings and turning them, feel for any binding, roughness, play etc. The bearings should turn freely, smoothly, and silently. Put a smear of grease on the seals to help them seat properly.

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Now re-install the axle by sliding the axle into the diff, holding the axle as straight as possible and tapping the wheel end of the axle until the axle with circlip slides back into the final drive. Then re-install the bearing hub, hub, axle nut, brake caliper. Torque the axle nut to 250 ft/lbf or tighten up hard with a rattle gun. Make sure that you peen the axle nut over into the groove on the axle. Put your wheel back on and you're done. Oh, and top up your diff with oil if you lost any while the axle was out!

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What a mess!

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Fantastic! Thanks Cactus. Pin it!

Sent from my SM-F707U using Tapatalk
 
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Very nice. Thats a lot of tools you carry out riding with you.
 

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Cactus, Great write up replacing your CV boot. I like your comment about getting a couple of clips for the next time. Now you know that anytime you have and carry a spare part that part will never ever fail. If you get a spare CV boot kit you will never have to replace one again. Again great write up.
 

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Thanks all, hopefully it helps someone. Sport4x4 when I go away riding I always take this list, which stay back at camp,

socket set
ring spanner set
screwdriver set
18v rattle gun
lump hammer
large multigrips
vice clamps
tire plug kit
12v compressor
bag of rags
silver tape
cable ties

AZTrail I hope you're right!!!
 
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Thanks all, hopefully it helps someone. Sport4x4 when I go away riding I always take this list, which stay back at camp,

socket set
ring spanner set
screwdriver set
18v rattle gun
lump hammer
large multigrips
vice clamps
tire plug kit
12v compressor
bag of rags
Hey you forgot the small roll of automotive wire & some connectors. I also have spare fuses and relays. I'm not getting shut down of the cost of a spare relay or fuse. Another item is a 1/2" recovery rope which is all you need to snatch a buggy out of the river sand hole.
 

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Hey you forgot the small roll of automotive wire & some connectors. I also have spare fuses and relays. I'm not getting shut down of the cost of a spare relay or fuse. Another item is a 1/2" recovery rope which is all you need to snatch a buggy out of the river sand hole.
Amazing how a bit of rusty fence wire doubles for a spare fuse 🤣 but you're right those would be handy, actually I might put a thread up about what tools to take away.
 
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